Roof on the Hill / Alphaville Architects

Architects: Alphaville Architects
Location: Takarazuka, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan
Leading Designers: Kentaro Takeguchi, Asako Yamamoto/Alphaville
Area: 100 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Kai Nakamura

General Contractor: Ohsawa Komuten
Site Area: 232 sqm

From the architect. Avoiding the removal of a hard hill as much as possible, a roof simply covers the residence.

Extended in steps, the residence is made with 3 meter by 3 meter grid steel frame that supports roof. The space is composed of boxes that receive bedroom, children’s room and wet area and the rest is left out of boxes. Above them high side light that penetrate through the roof, which undulates like mountain range, in 45-degree angle light up the interior brightly.

Until then we often thought about spaces made of surfaces in consideration to expression of shades. Here in order to emphasize the condition of saw-tooth roof floating on natural topography, we introduced line expression of exposed steel beam without putting up ceilings.

The beam is kept small to 100 millimeter by 148 millimeter. The same sized braces are a part of roof that supports high side light. Like so, any structural waste is shaved off, but by the multiplier effect of the thinness and the 45-degree an extensive feeling and calmness similar to under trees was achieved. On the other hand, box spaces have 100 millimeter thick walls made with painted off 100 millimeter square columns. Exposed roof deck ceiling is matt white and the surfaces softly reflect light.

The three logical rules, the natural topography, grid structure, and 45 degree tilted high side light that face the south, are respectively independent, but overlap each other and secure functionality that extends as far as possible, the architecture that involves various landscapes that only exist at this location was attained.

Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects © Kai Nakamura
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects Axonometric
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects Floor Plan
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects Section
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects Elevation
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects Elevation
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects Elevation
Roof on the Hill  / Alphaville Architects Elevation

Roof on the Hill / Alphaville Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 21 Apr 2014.

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DIESEL SHIBUYA Home Collection "Windows" by Office of Kimihiko Okada

A room that consists of layers of various window. It is a proposal for the store that suggest a new life style, inspired by the Diesel rock spirit of Diesel Home Collection. Function of a window is to expose to the outside world and to enable one to overlook the outside scenery. It is also a frame that connects him or her to the adjoin world. Window arouses the images of not yet seen world and is a place to imagine a new life. These windows, giving an irresistible temptation to peep, are the theme of the design. We design a room that creates the image of lives with a touch of uniqueness and creativity. By positioning many windows that can be freely opened and closed, we create various pattern of displays. The combination of the display, and Home Collection, unique and full of variety, will express diverse scenes and ideas of life and generates the image of new life style.
 

Exhibition Information

Title: Windows

Artist: KIMIHIKO OKADA

Date: 2014.2.21 [FRI] – 2015.2.15 [SUN]

Venue: DIES…

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Selldorf Architects seeking Senior Administrative Assistant in New York, NY, US

Selldorf Architects is an award winning international architecture and interior design firm based in Manhattan.  The 65-person firm’s portfolio encompasses a wide range of projects including cultural, institutional, commercial, and residential. The firm is seeking a qualified professional to serve as Senior Administrative Assistant to support our Managing Partner and the other partners in the area of Operations, Finance and Human Resources to ensure the smooth day-to-day operations of the firm.  Position is responsible for managing two administrative interns. The position is a full-time permanent position.

The successful candidate will have the following qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree preferred

  • 2-4 years experience required. Prior experience with a design firm not essential.

  • Must have excellent Excel and other Microsoft Office suite skills including Outlook

  • Must be a self-starter with the ability to work independently at times

  • Must be comfortable working in a fast-paced environment wit…

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Competition: five Synthetic Aesthetics books to be won

Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg book competition

Competition: Dezeen has teamed up with publishers MIT Press to offer readers the chance to win one of five copies of a new book about developments in synthetic biology. (more…)


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LEGO® Architecture’s Newest Edition: BIG’s Unbuilt LEGO® House

LEGO® has released their newest, limited-edition architecture set: BIG’s unbuilt LEGO® House. Planned from completion in 2016, the creatively stacked “experience center,” which will commemorate the toy company’s history and future, is the first unbuilt project offered as part of the series.

The minimalist, white block set is only available for purchase in LEGO®’s hometown of Billund (or here on ebay). A glimpse of just how the blocks (and building) might be constructed, after the break…

Click here to view the embedded video.

Read all about the LEGO® House design, here.

Reference: A/N, A Daily Dose of Architecture

LEGO® Architecture's Newest Edition: BIG's Unbuilt LEGO® House originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 21 Apr 2014.

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Pivot Architecture seeking Marketing Coordinator in Eugene, OR, US

PIVOT Architecture, a 32-person architecture firm based in Eugene, OR, is seeking an experienced Marketing Coordinator to lead the preparation of the firm’s marketing materials.  The ideal candidate will collaborate with firm leadership to generate marketing proposals and other marketing materials, coordinate with consultants, maintain internal and external marketing resources, and assist with presentations and interview preparation.  Established in 1956, our practice offers long-term career potential, stability and an opportunity to make a meaningful contribution to the firm’s ongoing success.

We imagine the ideal candidate having a degree in Marketing, Journalism, Advertising, Architecture, or similar, as well as a minimum of three years of experience in coordination and preparation of marketing materials for a professional service company.  Experience with architectural, engineering, or construction firms is a plus. As you might expect, this position requires excellent written and…

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Studio Pei-Zhu seeking Landscape Architect in Beijing, CN

Studio Profile
Studio Pei-Zhu is one of the leading Chinese architecture firms. Located in Beijing, the office presents a platform for nature inspired design that reflects on an array of innovative design works. Founded in 2005, Studio Pei-Zhu has accomplished many renowned projects, including the Guggenheim Art Pavilion in Abu Dhabi, Guggenheim Museum Beijing, Digital Beijing (the Control Center at the Beijing Olympics in 2008),  Cai Guoqiang courtyard house renovation in Beijing, Blur Hotel in Beijing, the Pace Museum in Beijing, OCT Design Museum in Shenzhen, the Minsheng Contemporary Art Museum in Beijing. Currently the office is working on many cultural projects including museums, libraries, culture centers, and theaters. The works of Studio Pei Zhu have also been chosen for international exhibitions at the Venice Biennale, Victoria and Albert Museum, Centre Pompidou, Biennial Sao Paulo, etc; and many of the works have also been collected by important international museums.

Pei Z…

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Studio Pei-Zhu seeking Architect in Beijing, CN

Studio Profile
Studio Pei-Zhu is one of the leading Chinese architecture firms. Located in Beijing, the office presents a platform for nature inspired design that reflects on an array of innovative design works. Founded in 2005, Studio Pei-Zhu has accomplished many renowned projects, including the Guggenheim Art Pavilion in Abu Dhabi, Guggenheim Museum Beijing, Digital Beijing (the Control Center at the Beijing Olympics in 2008),  Cai Guoqiang courtyard house renovation in Beijing, Blur Hotel in Beijing, the Pace Museum in Beijing, OCT Design Museum in Shenzhen, the Minsheng Contemporary Art Museum in Beijing. Currently the office is working on many cultural projects including museums, libraries, culture centers, and theaters. The works of Studio Pei Zhu have also been chosen for international exhibitions at the Venice Biennale, Victoria and Albert Museum, Centre Pompidou, Biennial Sao Paulo, etc; and many of the works have also been collected by important international museums.

Pei Z…

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Mental Health in Architecture School: Can the Culture Change?

The Graduate Architecture, Landscape, and Design Student Union (GALDSU) at the University of Toronto recently published the results of its first mental health survey, which asked students to reflect on their experience at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design. Many past and present students have met the findings, which paint a blatantly bleak picture of the architecture student experience, with little to no surprise. The report brings the issue of poor mental and physical health in architecture schools to the forefront of our consciousness; however, the cool response it has elicited undercuts the initiative and raises important questions. If we were already aware of the problem, why hasn’t change already been initiated? Will this always be the accepted, brutal reality of architecture education?

The student responses identify infrastructure as a significant challenge and suggest that improvements to mental and physical health could be made with the development of cleaner, larger, and quieter work spaces. Students also voiced their concern over a shortage of amenities, including too few vacant computers in labs as well as a lack of available, inexpensive food options. Indeed, one of the greatest ironies of architecture school is often having to study in the most uninspiring, poorly designed, and outdated spaces on campus.

However, although the study insinuates improvements to infrastructure and amenities is a sure way to improve student health, it would take great resources to make these kinds of changes, which most schools do not have immediate access to. Acquiring such funds would require time and in all likeliness, hiked fees for students, which many might be opposed to — especially if they are not going to be the ones who reap the benefits.

In order to make improvements, there would certainly need to be a lot of understanding and dialogue between students, faculty, and personnel from the university at large. However, the survey identified student apathy towards faculty and administration members as a major issue; the majority of student stress was directly attributed to their authority figures. Survey respondents recognized their largest sources of stress as being “workload, lack of organization from the faculty, coinciding deadlines, and negative interactions with members of the faculty.” Only 3% felt as though faculty was doing enough to address mental health issues amongst students.

When trying to answer the question of why architecture schools remain such mentally and physically draining places to study, this apathetic attitude towards faculty is an important factor to consider. When students feel disconnected from the communities they are supposed to be a part of, they may be even more hesitant to speak up.

Moreover, in order to keep up with the stressful and demanding workload, survey respondents confessed to having developed many bad habits. The majority of students admitted to regularly pulling all-nighters, skipping meals, forgoing extracurricular social activities, and rarely exercising in order to finish projects on time. Bad habits are formed when a specific behavior results in a favorable outcome, leading to the conditioned repetition of these actions. In these cases, the positive reinforcement comes in the form of producing a better project on time, which evidently outweighs the adverse affects on mental and physical health these behaviors also produce for respondents.

While the study does not suggest a reason for why students would choose the positive over the negative, the choice could be a product of the environment. When we see our peers acting a certain way and perceive it as the norm, we feel justified perpetuating the behavior. This is especially magnified in architecture school as students tend to do most of their work in the infamous studio, constantly surrounded by their peers.

Imagine if changes were implemented to remedy all of the issues regarding infrastructure, amenities, and communication. Would students continue to raise the bar, maintaining their bad habits to produce even better work? Or would they finally have the time to lead more balanced and healthy lifestyles? Even if the tangible problems were completely resolved, is it simply impossible to change today’s architecture school culture? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Mental Health in Architecture School: Can the Culture Change? originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 21 Apr 2014.

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Ciudad De La Justicia / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago

Architects: Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa , Miguel Santiago
Location: Calle Málaga, 2, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain
Architects In Charge: Ramón Cruz, Alexis López, Alejandra Vera, Juan José Martínez, Susana Gerstberger, Sonia Montesinos, Salvador Padrón, Guacimara Quintana, Javier Cabrera, Olga del Castillo, Ruth Suárez, José Luis Novo, Daniel Hernández, Juan Jurado, Carmen Juliá
Area: 89700.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Roland Halbe

Project Director: Raquel Carmona
Structure: BOMA – Luis Moya, Reveriego y Asociados, Arquitectos S.L. , Gerant Bordón, Virginia San Martín
Installation: Grupo JG, RG10 Ingeniería Internacional – Daniel Cabrera
Surveyors: Miguel Llinás, Teresa Bautista, Pedro Nogués
Sustainable Design: ARUP (competición)
Models: Jorge Queipo Riventi

From the architect. In taking its place in the city the building embraces its role as a hinge between the historic heart of the city and the neighborhood of San Cristobal, a prototype of modern urban planning in the 1960s.

We have not sought to make its organizational structure offer an excessively strong or imposed image, but to respect and enhance the skyline of this part of the city. A profile with a variable section: a skin that envelops the building in a rhythmic zigzag. The variable shoots and outgrowths reduce the scale, adapting to a residential setting of variable heights.

Seen from a distance, the building´s exterior reflects the flow of people. The interior street and panoramic lifts render the continual coming and going of visitors visible from nearby Avenida Maritima.

Looking forward the old town or the Cathedral or arriving in the great access plaza, a very large cantilever makes a gesture of friendly welcome the people entering inside.

In the interior a wide glazed street acts as a continuation of the urban space, its rhythm marked by landscaped patios that provide natural light and ventilation to the ground floor, the floor that receives most visitors. The functioning structure is more like that of a city than of a single building. The great interior street gives access to the vertical communications system serving each of the judicial buildings.

Finally, there is the aim of achieving a balanced austere image, a white crystalline building that symbolizes truth and justice, but without renouncing its representative character; close to the citizens, but maintaining the distance of respect for the institution.

The pursuit of a forthright but fragmented image, transparent and opaque, horizontal and vertical at the same time: hence the proposed motto: “One is Many”. A communal building that contains others, intimately linked, but also a concept: the acceptance of diversity and multiplicity, understanding that “one is indeed one and many at the same time” (from the Metapolis Dictionary).

Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago © Roland Halbe
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago Ground Floor Plan
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago First Floor Plan
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago Third Floor Plan
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago Type Floor Plan
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago Type Floor Plan
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago Longitudinal Section
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago Longitudinal Section
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago Drawing 1
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago Drawing 2
Ciudad De La Justicia  / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago Rendering

Ciudad De La Justicia / Magüi González, José Antonio Sosa, Miguel Santiago originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 21 Apr 2014.

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Project Architect in New York, NY, US

We are currently looking for a Project Architect to join our team. We are a small design studio located in New York working on a series of large-scale architecture projects. This is an excellent opportunity to work in a dynamic, collaborative studio environment on a variety of international and domestic projects.

Candidates must exhibit a strong ability to manage people and deadlines, as well as posses excellent technical production and detailing skills. The candidate must have at least 5 to 8 years of experience in the development of full sets of architectural construction documents and specifications and all of their component parts, and be articulate, both verbally and in written correspondence.

Requirements, Skills & Qualifications:

  • Ability to communicate effectively with consultants, clients, and contractors; experience coordinating work of all consultants

  • Comfort in working independently; demonstrates fluency and professionalism in dealing with a variety of high-end clients as wel…

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Amenta Emma Architects seeking Architectural Interior Designer (+/- 5 years experience) in Hartford, CT, US

Amenta Emma Architects is seeking a talented Interior Designer to join our recently relocated Downtown Hartford Office and be part of a creative, collaborative team focused on academic, commercial, mixed-use and senior living projects.  Candidate should have excellent design, graphic and verbal presentation skills.  Responsibilities will include collaboration with programming, design, detailing and FF&E.  Firm offers competitive compensation and strong growth opportunities.

Candidates must have a B.A. or B.S. in Interior Design and submit a cover letter, 3 references and sample of work.

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